Best Wedding Florists Add Personality to One-Of-A-Kind Wedding Flowers

Wedding consultants quite literally strive to “make bridal dreams come true” by becoming familiar with a bride’s unique tastes, interests, and even hobbies! A bride’s individual interests, from butterflies to French bulldogs, can be incorporated to create matchlessly breathtaking wedding flowers. Not only do wedding florists look to develop personal relationships with brides, but understanding what makes each bride unique is essential in creating a one-of-a-kind look.

The best wedding florists work with any bride’s budget to produce the flowers of her dreams through the most resourceful methods. In dreaming up the perfect wedding, brides should identify the bridal flower features that are most important to them. That way, wedding consultants can easily accentuate the right focus for each wedding. For example, brides often “recycle” ceremony pieces during the reception, which creates a unified look that fits well within a bride’s budget. Discerning a bride’s wedding flower priorities helps wedding consultants generate unique floral presentations that do not put a strain on the budget.

A bride’s unique wedding tastes can be seamlessly molded into modern, vintage, or traditional styles, depending on her preferences. For the modern bride, wedding florists produce cutting-edge and contemporary styles brought to life through brilliant color and refreshing presentation. Similarly, an airy, whimsical presentation of softer tones for a dreamlike, vintage bridal look can be fashioned with a bride’s specific color and stylistic preferences in mind. Wedding florists can even adapt traditional styles to any bride’s wedding flower dreams – a look distinguished by red, white, and pink tones to emphasize the sentiments of love and passion. Brides who are uncertain about which style suits their liking can view wedding flower photos in bridal magazines and on wedding websites, such as The Knot. Ultimately, getting in touch with her own interests and wedding tastes will help any bride determine the perfect colors and floral trends for her special day.

In summary: This article explains how a bride’s individual interests, from butterflies to French bulldogs, can be incorporated to create matchlessly breathtaking wedding flowers. The best wedding florists work with any bride’s budget to produce the flowers of her dreams through the most resourceful methods. A bride’s unique wedding tastes can be seamlessly molded into modern, vintage, or traditional styles, depending on her preferences. Ultimately, getting in touch with her own interests and wedding tastes will help any bride determine the perfect colors and floral trends for her special day.

Wedding Flowers Ideas – Avoid These 5 Critical Mistakes On Your Special Day

With most endeavors in life there is a form of balance. We might not always recognize it as natural equilibrium when we see and experience it, but it is normally present in one guise or another. This very often becomes extrapolated in how we approach certain circumstances and at what point do we continue to persist with our own inherent skills and enthusiasm, as opposed to calling in a specialist and merely getting involved in the peripheral strategic decisions.

Making decisions on wedding flowers types is no exception, and it is an area of your wedding that requires careful circumspection. After all do you want your photos to be consigned to your cousin practicing with his point-and-shoot camera, understanding that financially it will probably cost you nothing, but then accepting the reciprocal risk that some, and even possibly most of the photos will be a reflection of his skill, or lack of it, or do you want a photo journalistic story, told with high class photos, embossed in a wedding album that will probably last you the rest of your life, conversely accepting that a professional photographer will come with a professional fee. At the end of the day it is your choice so make it wisely when it comes to wedding flowers.

Mistakes are often due to human error and also are often a reflection of a lack of skill. When making decisions on your wedding flowers types be cognizant of, and avoid at all costs, the following pitfalls:

Flower type, combination and color: Select you flowers carefully in terms of color, type, exclusivity or mixed combinations. Certain flowers simple make excellent combinations, for example calla lilies and roses or bird of paradise with orchids. Alternatively a white wedding dress and white flowers makes for a stunning combination. Be careful of being unorthodox with combinations or using very unusual colors. These flowers might not be available on your wedding day or could be prohibitively expensive.

Flower toxicity: As much as it is an oddity, be careful of occasional flower toxicity issues. These are infrequent but do exist, for example stargazer lilies can be highly toxic to domestic cats, the stems of calla lilies can secrete a toxic sap that can cause a skin rash with some people and as a precaution should be sealed, and remarkably daffodils similarly can be toxic to both animals and other cut flowers and can also cause skin rashes with people. Anthuriums also can be mildly toxic to people and animals. The bottom line is design your arrangements carefully, keep physical handling to a minimum and in terms of good safety practice wash your hands regularly when handling the flowers.

Lack of experience: When making final decisions on the kinds of flowers you want and in what combinations, our instinct can sometimes be counter-intuitive. Use an experienced, technically skilled florist to assist you. They have seen it all, good and bad, and wedding flowers make up a big chunk of their business. Debate, communicate, contribute, suggest and even challenge, but ultimately trust your florist. The additional expense for professional advice with your wedding flowers ideas will be a rewarding investment in your wedding. Your florist is there to protect you and your flowers.

Flower photography: Life it not fair sometimes and being a bride is no exception. You are unfortunately simply expected to be the quintessential communicator when it comes to your wedding day. As important as the communication is between you and your florist, you need to guarantee that your photographer clearly understands what your expectations are in this regard.

Your wedding flowers ideas form a critical part of the story your wedding day tells and apart from being enjoyed in the moment on the day this story needs to be embedded forever in your wedding album. You need to clearly explain to your photographer the necessity for the wedding flowers to play a pivotal role in the photographs. Sometimes even going to the extent of hiring an additional photographer just to photograph the flowers is a consideration.

Poor planning: Avoid poor or late planning at all costs. Like most future events, planning injects a dose of reality and goes a long way to ensuring a relatively seamless day. Whilst it is no guarantee for success, it simply helps to identify some of the more complex issue upfront. Plan your day, plan your venue and plan your flowers well in advance and you will largely, if not completely, avoid last minute potential disasters and unmitigated panic, both of which you can do without on your special day.

Better Photo Tips – Keep it Simple

One day you spot an interesting small stone wall. Just past that you notice a pretty young girl playing in a field of flowers. Behind that you notice an old weathered barn with an old tractor sitting in front. “Ah”, you say to yourself, “the perfect photo”. But is it really? No. It may be the perfect series of photos, but that’s a different story.

This picture would fail as a great shot; A) because it is far too complex a composition, and B) the camera has no way to effectively focus your attention on four different subjects on four different planes at the same time. Let’s break this down to the more realistic shots.

Photo #1 – – – You get down low enough that you see the stone wall in the foreground with the classic barn and tractor in the background. Using selective focus, the wall is sharp and the barn and tractor are a soft hazy pastel type background. 

Photo #2 – – – You lean over the fence, zoom in on the young girl with the field of flowers as the background. Using selective focus, you make the girl in sharp focus and the flowers around her gradually get softer and softer. Your camera is at enough of an angle that your do NOT include the barn and tractor in this image.

Photo #3 – – – Getting the owners permission first, you climb over the fence. You compliment the little girl on the pretty flowers; then you shoot past her using the flowers as the foreground and the barn as the background. You may again want to get down low so that the flowers become more dominant. Using selective focus, you focus on the flowers about one third of the way into the field, making them sharp and still having the rest of the field and the barn in soft focus.

Photo #4 – – – Since you already have the owners permission, you walk around the field until you get close enough to the barn and tractor. This time you decide to get down really low (you are laying on your stomach). You fill 2/3rds of the frame with the tractor. Using selective focus, you make the tractor in sharp focus and the barn is now soft focus.

These are the basic shots I would shoot in this situation. Now admittedly there are other possible combinations. You could; (for example) put the tractor in the lower 1/3rd of the frame, then focus on the barn and deliberately make the tractor itself go soft focus. This way the tractor is framing the rest of the shot. To be honest there are dozens of possibilities, but each of those still boils down to one main subject and one supporting background (or foreground).

Yes, the camera can technically take a shot with everything in it. But the human mind is only going to focus on one story, or one set of foreground/background images at a time. Your job is not to capture the universe of possibilities all at one time and confuse your viewer. Your job is to point out the individual miracles within the universe so that your viewer can appreciate them more than they ever have before.

The most powerful images in history are those that are simple and direct. They tell a story. The viewer should immediately be drawn to your image and feel an emotional impact. This can not happen if he or she has to visually sort through all the clutter you left in the image. If you want to be award winning, if you want to get published, if you want to sell your work . . . keep it simple.